Conrad Steinmann, Recorders

A Series of 12 Videos

It is a great pleasure to record this continuing video series at various places in Swizuerland with Conrad Steinmann. His own compositions and his unique playing on these simple instruments are a revelation for me!

"Io son fiorito"

After the madrigal "Io son ferito" by Palestrina, ca. 1525 - 1594, and the diminutions by G. B. Bovicelli, 1550 to ca. 1594, from his "Regole, passaggi di musica", Venezia 1594. Solo version by Conrad Steinmann 2020.

Instrument: recorder in g' after Bassano by Taavi-Mats Utt, 2001; in mammoth ivory.

Recordings taken on November 6, 2020 in the church of Schuders.

Iktsuarpok

Iktsuarpok (2020) by Conrad Steinmann (*1951)
Plexiglas overtone flute in F on 465 Hz. by Lukas Rohner, 2006

Iktsuarpok is a word from the language of the Greenlandic Inuit and describes the yearning feeling of an Inuit who steps out of his igloo to scan the wide horizon with his eyes, in the vague hope of discovering a possible visitor.

Recordings taken on November 6, 2020 in the church of Schuders.

Virgo, sidus aureum


Virgo, sidus aureum from the Codex Las Huelgas (Burgos), around 1300.
Processing Conrad Steinmann.

Instrument: Soprano recorder (Rosenborg) in 465 Hz. by Frederick G. Morgan, 1983; maple.

Recordings taken on November 6, 2020 in the church of Schuders.

Mandilátos

Trad. from northern Thrace/Greece, after a field photo 1973 with Nikos Strikos, lýra, and Ioannis Poulimenou, daoúli.

Conrad Steinmann plays a soprano recorder in c'' (Rosenborg) by Evgenij Ilarionov, Kiev.
Played in front of the 3-part "Rorschach Screen" by Peter Randall-Page on the occasion of his solo exhibition in the monastery Schönthal/Langenbruck (Switzerland).

Qale Gnizza

8th sound of the church Qale Gnizza, ev. from the 6th century, handed down by the archdeacon Asmar from Beirut, with a comment of August 20, 2019 by Conrad Steinmann.

Conrad Steinmann plays a Renaissance bass recorder in C by Bob Marvin, 1991.
Played in front of the sculpture "Envelope of pulsation 1" by Peter Randall-Page on the occasion of his solo exhibition in the monastery Schönthal/Langenbruck (Switzerland).

Conrad Steinmann: 4pm


Conrad Steinmann: 4pm (2013)
for a renaissance or flute in c''with as narrow a bore as possible

Conrad Steinmann  plays on a tenor flute by Evgenji Ilarionov (Kiev) after a model by Claude Rafi, Lyon, c. 1540, on the pitch of 465

Conrad Steinmann: alfabet


Conrad Steinmann: alfabet (2010)
for a bass recorder
inspired by the poem "alfabet" by the Danish poet Inger Christensen and written for "Alif Beh" by the Egyptian artist Hazem El Mestikawy.

Bulgarian folk song


Plačí, plačí, naplačí se (trad. from Bulgary)

Wine, wine, Marí Máro ejo,
wine you out,
your girlhood is over...

Conrad Steinman plays on a Rafi tenor flute by Evgenji Ilarionov (Kiev)

Conrad Steinmann: Lamento


Conrad Steinmann: sopra il lamento di Reso per soprano solo (2014)
Paraphrase of the " Lamento " for flute solo by Reso Kiknadze (Georgia)

Jacob van Eyck: Pavaen Lachrymae


Jacob van Eyck (c. 1590-1657):
Pavaen Lachrymae, from: Der Fluyten Lust-hof, Utrecht 1644
after "Lachrimae Antiquae" by John Dowland.

Conrad Steinmann plays on a renaissance flute in g' from Mammut, by Taavi-Mats Utt (Estonia), 2003.

Conrad Steinmann: vivace e suave


Conrad Steinmann: vivace e suave (2017)
for 1 alto recorder.

With thanks to Sylvestro (Ganassi) and Ivo (Dimchev) for inspiration.

Alrune


Alrune (original version, 1979) by Roland Moser (1943*)
Conrad Steinmann, Ocarina.

Instrument: Ocarina in c'', EWA Vienna, around 1920, from the estate of Roland Moser's grandfather; fired clay.

Recordings taken on November 6, 2020 in the church of Schuders.

 

This whole video series with Conrad Steimann awakens in me what Heidegger calls "uncanny". Not uncanny in the sense of spooky, but in the sense of non-native.

When you suddenly step into a completely strange landscape, in which everything you know disappears and the structures of what you are and know dissolve, so that something really new can happen. It's very nice how the tranquility of the artist's posture merges with the silence of the surroundings and the music seems to come almost completely out of nowhere. Almost as if the music here is a playing of what otherwise possesses neither language nor sound.

Andrew D'Ambrosi